12 Books review for Politics of Identity and Bodoland Movement in Assam

BODO PEOPLE HAVE OWN ART, LANGUAGE, TRADITION, CULTURE, HISTORY, TASTE. HAVE LEADERS, FIGHTERS, PASSION. HAVE FAITH, DREAMS, PATIENCE, PASSION, STRENGTH. BODO ARE UNIQUE . BODO ARE TOUGH. BODO ARE BRIGHT. BODO FOUGHT A 47 YEARS BATTLE FOR OWN EXISTENCE BODO WERE, BODO ARE AND BODO WILL STAND UNITED FOR OWN RIGHTS. HISTORY IS EVIDENCE, TIME IS WITNESS, LAW PERMITS BODO PEOPLE DESERVE __ “CREAT BODOLAND.

The authors have attempted to analyse Bodos historical background, socio-political status, the different phases of the movement so far crossed, the leadership of the movement, the participation of the Bodo people in the democratic electoral politics of India etc.

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1 Why a Bodoland? By Bokul Chandra Basumatary
2 The Bodo civilization by Bokul Chandra Basumatary
3 The treaties of Bodos by Bokul Chandra Basumatary

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4 Why Bodo movement? by Khema Sonowal

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5 The dream of Udayachal by Charan Narzary

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6 The Bodo of Assam Revisiting a Classical Study from 1950
by Halfdan Siiger (edited by Peter B. Andersen and Santosh K. Soren)

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7 Politics of Identity and the Bodo Movement in Assam by Deka , Hira Moni
8The Bodos and the Movement for Self-Determination Paperback – Import, 14 Sep 2011 by Khema Sonowal
9 Bodoland movement, 1986-2001: a dream and reality by Yamao Zwhwlao Brahma, All Bodo Students’ Union (Kokrajhar, India)
10 The Bodo Movement and Women Participation by Sucheta Sen Chaudhuri

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11 Bodos – Emergence and Assertion of an Ethnic Minority by Sujit Choudhary
12. The novel, Jerwi Hagramaya Gabw, by Ratna Bharali Talukdar .
The Bodo (or Boros) are one of the indigenous tribal peoples of Assam. During colonial times they resisted Christianization and in recent decades they have been involved both in interethnic violence and separatist insurgencies. Much research has gone into understanding the Boros and their aspirations but an issue has been that earlier accounts of this once-animist people are meagre and date from the colonial period. The rediscovery and publication of the ethnographic material based on fieldwork carried out by Halfdan Siiger among the Boros in 1949–50 is thus hugely important. Siiger’s manuscript is unique, offering detailed descriptions of the social and ritual life of the Boros and new insights into the traditions and myths as they were told in the village he studied before the transformation of religious life in recent decades. Thanks to Siiger’s diligent translation and interpretation, the manuscript also preserves a number of ritual formulas and songs in the Boro language. Siiger’s manuscript is given even greater relevance by the inclusion of more recent material contributed by the editors and other contemporary scholars. In addition, his original photos are augmented by new photos from the village and by rare images from the collections of the National Museum of Denmark.
The Bodo (or Boros) are one of the indigenous tribal peoples of Assam. During colonial times they resisted Christianization and in recent decades they have been involved both in interethnic violence and separatist insurgencies. Much research has gone into understanding the Boros and their aspirations but an issue has been that earlier accounts of this once-animist people are meagre and date from the colonial period. The rediscovery and publication of the ethnographic material based on fieldwork carried out by Halfdan Siiger among the Boros in 1949 – 50 is thus hugely important. Siiger’s manuscript is unique, offering detailed descriptions of the social and ritual life of the Boros and new insights into the traditions and myths as they were told in the village he studied before the transformation of religious life in recent decades. Thanks to Siiger’s diligent translation and interpretation, the manuscript also preserves a number of ritual formulas and songs in the Boro language. Siiger’s manuscript is given even greater relevance by the inclusion of more recent material contributed by the editors and other contemporary scholars. In addition, his original photos are augmented by new photos from the village and by rare images from the collections of the National Museum of Denmark.
The term Bodos has been used by the older generation of scholars to denote earliest Indo-Mongoloid migrants to eastern Indian who subsequently spread over different regions of Bengal, Assam and Tripura. But recent developments make it imperative to redefine the term Bodo and its wider denotation deserves to be abandoned in recognition of the emerging socio-political vocabulary; the Bodo means the plain tribes of western and northern Assam known earlier as the Bodo-Kacharis of the Brahmaputra Valley. Only that aspect of Bodo history has been considered in this study which can be traced on the basis of evidences, direct or indirect, and at the same time on the complex process of formation of the Assamese nationality vis-à-vis the evolution of Bodo society. This monograph is an attempt to trace different phases of history through which the Bodos emerged as the most dominant ethnic minority of Assam.

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3 thoughts on “12 Books review for Politics of Identity and Bodoland Movement in Assam”

  1. रादाबखौ मोनना जोबोद दुगानाय आरो बोलो गियानखौ मोन्दोँ।
    जोबोद मोजां जादोँ, जोबोद साबायखर होनो गोनां।
    दुलाराय बर’ हारियानो हारिनि अलखद, दुखु, नाख्रेबजानाय, थगायजानायखौ मिथियै गैला नाथाय बुजिनोसो आद्रा दं। बबे लामाजोँ थांब्ला बबे लामाजोँ ओँखारहैगोन एबा सोरनि आदर्सजोँ सोलिनांगोन। दुलाराइ खना खनला थानाय बर’फोरनो रादाब बिलाइ, सावथुन, मेथाइ, थुनलाइ गासैखौबो हमना दिन्थिनायनि बुजि होनायनि सम सफैबाय। दिनै थुनलाइनि मोखां नुयै सुबुं दं, मेथाइ खोनाफेरै मानसिबो दं,
    टि भी सावथुन नुफेरै, रादाब बिलाइ फरायै मानसिबो बर’फोरनि गेजेराव दं।
    बेखायनो मोनफ्रोम बिथिँजोँनो फोसावनो हायोब्ला मोजां जागौ होनना आं सानो।
    ” गेदेमा थैदोँ बेखौ जोगारदोँ,
    गेदेमा जादोँ सोँखारिदोँ;
    बेयो बर’नि मोनसे गाज्रि लैखोन।बेखौ बर’फोरनि गेजेराव फोसाबनो जोबोद गोनां आथिखालाव।
    जै बर’ बिमानि।
    बर’सा खौसे जाथोँ।”

    Liked by 1 person

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